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The Shayman who won the Victoria Cross

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1 hour ago, Trackingback said:

I never knew a former Shayman won the Victoria Cross fighting the Japanese in the jungle of Burma in 1944.

In the latest edition of Britain at War ( https://britainatwar.keypublishing.com) there's a brilliant, in-depth piece on Hanson Turner, the Halifax bus driver who five times single-handily took on the enemy with grenades before being killed on his sixth sortee.

As well as immense detail and evocative pictures, is the line: "By the end of the 1930s, Hanson was enjoying the settled life he craved, with a wife and daughter but with precious little time for indulgences beyond a spot of gardening and following the fortunes of his beloved Halifax Town FC".

There is, what I guess, is a memorial rather than a grave to this blue-and-white hero at St Stephen's church in Copley. Wouldn't it be great if the club could formally recognise his heroic sacrifice on the 75th anniversary of his death and the award of the highest accolade for valour?

The magazine is available on the above link and I've also seen if sometimes on sale in Sainsbury's.

Great suggestion

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There used to be a portrait of Hanson Turner in the boardroom at the Skircoat Road bus garages. A truly brave and courageous man, I sincerely hope the remarks about must be April edition of the magazine are not intended as references to April fools day.

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5 hours ago, Trackingback said:

I never knew a former Shayman won the Victoria Cross fighting the Japanese in the jungle of Burma in 1944.

In the latest edition of Britain at War ( https://britainatwar.keypublishing.com) there's a brilliant, in-depth piece on Hanson Turner, the Halifax bus driver who five times single-handily took on the enemy with grenades before being killed on his sixth sortee.

As well as immense detail and evocative pictures, is the line: "By the end of the 1930s, Hanson was enjoying the settled life he craved, with a wife and daughter but with precious little time for indulgences beyond a spot of gardening and following the fortunes of his beloved Halifax Town FC".

There is, what I guess, is a memorial rather than a grave to this blue-and-white hero at St Stephen's church in Copley. Wouldn't it be great if the club could formally recognise his heroic sacrifice on the 75th anniversary of his death and the award of the highest accolade for valour?

The magazine is available on the above link and I've also seen if sometimes on sale in Sainsbury's.

A very, very brave man. Makes you proud to be from Halifax even more than it normally does.

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My earlier reference to the April edition. I now realise people were referring to the icon in the link “to the April edition”.

I was aware of Mr Turner having worked many years at the bus depot. When I clicked on the link I couldn’t find anything about it and didn’t want people thinking it wasn’t correct, I didn’t see the icon to the April edition.

Edited by Riders of Rohan

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The portrait was at one time displayed in the Yorkshire Rider Club and it is possibly now in the Banksfield Museum.

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His picture was always on the wall in the hall at St.Augustine's Primary School, Hanson Lane. I believe he attended there.

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1 hour ago, Scouse Shayman said:

From The Duke of Wellington's Regiment website (dwr.org.uk)

4624899 Corporal (Acting Sergeant) Hanson Victor TURNER

1944 Cpl - ASgt Hanson Victor Turne

Acting-Sergeant Hanson Victor Turner, although originally a ‘Duke’, was serving with The West Yorkshire Regiment (The Prince of Wales’s Own) when he was awarded

his VC. When his medal was put up for sale it was purchased by the Halifax Town Council, as he was a resident of Halifax. The medal is displayed in the Duke of Wellington’s Museum for ease of access.

At Ningthoukong,in Burma, soon after midnight of 6th of June, 1944, an attack was made by a strong force of Japanese.  Three out of four light machine-guns in Sergeant Turner’s platoon were destroyed and the platoon forced to give ground.  Sergeant Turner, with coolness and fine leadership, at once reorganised his party and withdrew 40 yards.

When it was clear that the enemy were attempting to outflank the position, Sergeant Turner at once, boldly and fearlessly, went forward from his position alone, armed with all the hand grenades he could carry, and went into attack against the enemy single-handed.  He used his weapons with devastating effect and when his supply was exhausted he went back for more and returned to the offensive again.  During all this time the enemy were keeping up intense small arms and grenade fire.

Sergeant Turner in all made five journeys to obtain further supplies of grenades and it was on this sixth occasion still single-handed, while throwing a grenade among a party of the enemy, that he was killed.  He displayed outstanding valour and had not the slightest thought for his own safety.  He died on the battlefield in a spirit of supreme self-sacrifice.

(London Gazette, 17th of August, 1944)

These are the type of people we  remember at our Regimental Re -unions and also why the memorial to the fighting men of The West Riding will be unveiled in Halifax on 17th May. As the regimental motto says "Virtutis Fortuna Comes" (translated as Fortune favours the Brave)

A different breed them blokes, mate.

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On ‎04‎/‎04‎/‎2019‎ ‎12‎:‎04‎:‎55, Trackingback said:

I never knew a former Shayman won the Victoria Cross fighting the Japanese in the jungle of Burma in 1944.

In the latest edition of Britain at War ( https://britainatwar.keypublishing.com) there's a brilliant, in-depth piece on Hanson Turner, the Halifax bus driver who five times single-handily took on the enemy with grenades before being killed on his sixth sortee.

As well as immense detail and evocative pictures, is the line: "By the end of the 1930s, Hanson was enjoying the settled life he craved, with a wife and daughter but with precious little time for indulgences beyond a spot of gardening and following the fortunes of his beloved Halifax Town FC".

There is, what I guess, is a memorial rather than a grave to this blue-and-white hero at St Stephen's church in Copley. Wouldn't it be great if the club could formally recognise his heroic sacrifice on the 75th anniversary of his death and the award of the highest accolade for valour?

The magazine is available on the above link and I've also seen if sometimes on sale in Sainsbury's.

I happened to be in Copley this afternoon. The Church is open and there was a full description of his heroics and even a picture of the man. His name in on the war memorial complete with VC after his name. Worth a detour if you happen to be driving along Wakefield Road.

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14 hours ago, Lammie said:

Maybe at this years rememberance day game a few words about this exceptional man and a wreath in the centre circle. Maybe he has relatives who might wish to attend. I know that BPA always make an effort to remember Donald Bell VC on rememberance. It would be great to see us doing something.

Totally agree 

think the clubs both rugby and football should try and build the links that have built the town over the years 

and there should be a special place for the heroes of Halifax 

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On 04/04/2019, 12:04:55, Trackingback said:

I never knew a former Shayman won the Victoria Cross fighting the Japanese in the jungle of Burma in 1944.

In the latest edition of Britain at War ( https://britainatwar.keypublishing.com) there's a brilliant, in-depth piece on Hanson Turner, the Halifax bus driver who five times single-handily took on the enemy with grenades before being killed on his sixth sortee.

As well as immense detail and evocative pictures, is the line: "By the end of the 1930s, Hanson was enjoying the settled life he craved, with a wife and daughter but with precious little time for indulgences beyond a spot of gardening and following the fortunes of his beloved Halifax Town FC".

There is, what I guess, is a memorial rather than a grave to this blue-and-white hero at St Stephen's church in Copley. Wouldn't it be great if the club could formally recognise his heroic sacrifice on the 75th anniversary of his death and the award of the highest accolade for valour?

The magazine is available on the above link and I've also seen if sometimes on sale in Sainsbury's.

Extraordinary story, thanks for sharing this. Agree with the suggestions about the club officially honouring his memory at game on remembrance weekend

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15 hours ago, Lammie said:

Maybe at this years rememberance day game a few words about this exceptional man and a wreath in the centre circle. Maybe he has relatives who might wish to attend. I know that BPA always make an effort to remember Donald Bell VC on rememberance. It would be great to see us doing something.

The programme for the Bromley match will feature the final of the West Riding Junior Cup, played between Halifax Town and Mirfield United on 13 April 1912. Town's Harry Potter and Mirfield's Donald Bell, later to play with Bradford PA, would both lose their life during the First World War. Bell would be awarded the Victoria Cross, as stated above. Other players with Halifax Town connections to pay the ultimate sacrifice during the First World War were Billy Woodward and Frank Cannon. Harry Strike lost his life in the Second World War, as did guest players Frank Pollard (Bury) and Fred Fisher (Millwall).

Edited by Shaymus
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Another picture that should be on the Halifax Town Wall of Fame.  When will this happen and get some of our great players on display.  My grandfather was in the Dukes, he was gassed while fighting in Ypres.  Came home but was very ill and died at a young age.

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On 04/04/2019, 13:04:55, Trackingback said:

I never knew a former Shayman won the Victoria Cross fighting the Japanese in the jungle of Burma in 1944.

In the latest edition of Britain at War ( https://britainatwar.keypublishing.com) there's a brilliant, in-depth piece on Hanson Turner, the Halifax bus driver who five times single-handily took on the enemy with grenades before being killed on his sixth sortee.

As well as immense detail and evocative pictures, is the line: "By the end of the 1930s, Hanson was enjoying the settled life he craved, with a wife and daughter but with precious little time for indulgences beyond a spot of gardening and following the fortunes of his beloved Halifax Town FC".

There is, what I guess, is a memorial rather than a grave to this blue-and-white hero at St Stephen's church in Copley. Wouldn't it be great if the club could formally recognise his heroic sacrifice on the 75th anniversary of his death and the award of the highest accolade for valour?

The magazine is available on the above link and I've also seen if sometimes on sale in Sainsbury's.

Just managed to sit down and read this after picking it up last week. Just astonishing what Hanson did. What he and those soldiers faced is beyond our comprehension. Thanks for letting us know about this.

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Will go and pay my respects next time I visit 

nick 

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My grandad was in the same regiment during WWII. As he had an academic background, he was given a desk job back in India whilst his pals got to face the Japanese in Burma. He was all for staying in India after the war but the events in 1947 put paid to that notion. Because of all this, I'm here today supporting The Shaymen. 

Huge respect for the efforts of our brave men and women during WWII. 

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